Klondike Highway

Wow, it has been a little while since I have been able to get back to this!! Where does the time go??

We continued north on the Klondike Highway, highway 2, heading to the junction of hwy 2 and highway 11, at Stewart Crossing. We turned east on highway 11, the ‘Silver Trail’, on our way to Mayo and Keno.

dsc_4681-edit

It is about 50km from Stewart Crossing to Mayo. Gold was discovered in the banks of the Stewart River in 1885, and a gold strike along Duncan Creek brought more miners to the area in 1902.

dsc_4687-edit

Approx 59km further along is the historic town of Keno.

dsc_4723

Silver was discovered on Keno Hill in 1903. By 1915 there were winter roads leading to all the major mining creeks. Horses hauled silver ore from the Keno Hill mines, down to the Mayo sternwheeler landing. Bags of ore were then transported from Mayo to Whitehorse by sternwheeler until 1950 when finally an all-season road was constructed!

Both Mayo and Keno have maintained their history and there are many historic buildings in each town.

dsc_4725-edit

dsc_4733-edit

Keno City has also developed some tourism-based businesses, and its attraction is the Keno Mining Museum with an extensive collection dedicated to the history of mining in Yukon from the early 1900s until the present.

dsc_4803-edit

The signpost on the top of Keno Hill showing distances to places around the world.

dsc_4768-edit

It was very foggy on the ‘hill’ the day we went up, we were told the views are amazing! Once we were below the clouds the views and wildflowers lived up to their reputation!

dsc_4782-edit

We had two nights in the Mayo area then resumed our way to Dawson City. Once we got back to Stewart crossing to join the Klondike highway we ran into the first real construction of our trip! We were a little skeptical our motor home was going to make it on this stretch!

dsc_4881-edit

One of the things we really enjoyed along the Alaska and Yukon highways were the many roadhouses, most evolved from American military camps built during the construction of the road.  Roadhouses usually offered a place to stay, a meal and gas and were spaced no more than a day’s drive apart. We loved the sign for this one, and they had good hamburgers!

dsc_4905-edit

The scenery between Stewart Crossing and Dawson City was beautiful with many small lakes.

dsc_4938-edit

dsc_4949-edit

dsc_4962-edit

Soon we arrived at Dawson City, one of the iconic cities of the Yukon!

dsc_5018-edit

I think Dawson City deserves a story of it’s own, so….

Until next time!

2 thoughts on “Klondike Highway

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s